Conversations with a 1 yo

Vian has more than a few words in his vocabulary now and he's not afraid to show off.

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I'm having breakfast with Vian. 

We hear the bathroom flush. 

Vian gets all animated and yells "Poop!" and points to the restroom.

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Another day, the same setup. I'm having breakfast with Vian.

Yoshi joins us with a cup of tea. 

Vian points to the steam rising from the cup and yells "HOT". 

Yoshi acknowledges, yes. It is hot tea. 

Vian: "Hot Tea"  (sounds more like hottie). 

Me: Yes Vian, you're a hottie. 

Vian (yells): NO!

Me: You're not a hottie?

Vian: Amma hottie. 

Who am I to argue. ;)


Fun with dosas

I love dosas. Dosa is a south Indian dish. A better version of a crepe (shots fired) or a ridiculously thin pancake. Sempi (5yo) is also a huge fan. 

I'm making dosas for his breakfast and he requested that I make the dosas into shapes for him. He requested a police car. I was happy to oblige. 

Sempi: What is this?

Me: A police car. 

Sempi: It looks like a spaceship. Next time add some wheels to it.

Me: I'll see what I can do.


Language and Thought

I believe that the language you speak influences the way you think. I don't have any kind of proof other than some anecdotal evidence. 

Recently I started noticing this in the field of computer languages as well. I consider Python to be my dominant language. I have a coworker (let's call him Aaron, because that's his name) who likes to bait me by pointing out certain lack of features in Python and how Ruby gets it right. Most of the time I dismiss his complaints as invalid because I never have a use for those features in my day to day coding.

Then it dawned on me that I don't have a need for those features because I tend to think in Python. When I am presented with a problem I think of a solution that can be implemented in Python and my thought process naturally gravitates towards the features available in Python. 

What I learned from this realization is, if you learn many different languages you'll never be happy with any single language. You'll always yearn for that sweet feature that is missing in your current language. 

Let that be a lesson.

git open - A small git hack

You can add a git sub-command by defining a new alias in your ~/.gitconfig file as follows:

The git open defined in the ~/.gitconfig is mapped to a shell script called git-open.sh. 

This bash script does two things: 

1. It tries to detect if there are any files with uncommitted changes in the current repo and prints out the filenames.

2. If the repo doesn't have any uncommitted files, it'll print the filenames from the last commit.

The git open alias is mapped to open the output from this script using vim. 

Why is this useful?

I can pick up where I left off the previous day by simply typing `git open` inside the repo. This will open either all files with uncommitted changes or open the files from the last commit. There is a very good chance that my work for the day will continue on those files.

A small hack to make life a little bit easier.

Conversations with a 1 year old

Vian is picking up new words. His new addition is "Yeah". It is pronounced with an emphatic "EYAH!" (imagine a Karate yell).

I like asking him random questions that are at the edge of his understanding and watch him say "Yeah!".

But sometimes he uses his "Yeah!" with such precision it catches us off guard. Such as last night when we were getting him ready for bed.

Yoshi: Vian, would you like to hold a toy? You can pick either Pandie (stuffed panda) or the fire engine.

Vian: Yeah!